Tag Archives: 24 Hours

FIA WEC

The FIA WEC Super Season

Half-time in the FIA WEC ‘Super Season’

With the 6 Hours of Fuji behind us, and Shanghai just around the corner we are just over halfway through the 2018/19 FIA WEC ‘Super Season’, with just one race left this calendar year. This season has been a lot of things so far this year, but boring isn’t one of them. There has been drama aplenty, controversy, some great racing and enough story-lines to warrant the season’s label. As a result, we are left with plenty of hopes and fears heading into the home straight in 2019.

Equivalence of technology blues
The FIA WEC Prologue at Paul Ricard seems like an age ago. Pre-season testing is always tough to read into. Are teams showing their hand? What programmes are they running? Is the new machinery up to scratch yet? The 30-hour test to kick off the season did however, leave us with some clues of what was to come. Whilst the “unofficial” classification saw the top of the LMP1 privateer cabal faster than Toyota (Toyota’s official best times coming supposedly while running unrestricted), any bets on the private teams having a chance at competing for wins on track were quickly quashed at Spa, when the hybrid TS050s utterly dominated the competition. And it’s been like that ever since, leading to the big debate of Equivalence of Technology ruling the headlines ever since.
The questions we are left with, and still looking for answers for are as follows:
1. Should Toyota be penalized because the privateer prototypes aren’t yet quick enough?
2. Could the privateers compete even if all was equal on a performance level?
3. Should Toyota be handed an advantage for the sake of the FIA WEC’s public-facing image?

FIA WEC

Toyota has by far the most sophisticated, tried, tested and fastest car in the LMP1 field. Toyota has the only cars that are hybrid-powered now that Porsche is gone and the most experienced set of drivers, team personnel and resources. So, making it a contest is really hard. This is more than David v Goliath, this is David v Goliath, if Goliath had far more effective weaponry as well as a dominant stature. Surely, on that basis, you can make the argument that Toyota shouldn’t be artificially hobbled because the competition isn’t up to scratch? Well, at this point it’s a tough side of the fence to sit on. That’s because, wait for it… This is a sport, it’s entertainment, and there could be real trouble if the ACO and FIA WEC let Toyota run away with the title.

Now, so far there have been multiple Equivalence of Technology changes, in an attempt to give the field more balance, but it hasn’t been nearly enough for us to see real on-track action between the hybrid and non-hybrid machinery. That wasn’t helped by the fact that going into the season the privateers were forced to spend longer in the pits, and pit more often than the hybrids, artificially!
Le Mans was no contest, not even a tiny bit, not even for a lap. And since Silverstone, with most of the manufactured disadvantages taken away, the privateers are still not able to show off the true potential of their cars, as the fuel allowances per lap and stint are such that lifting and coasting down the straights (their only real area of advantage) is still necessary. That, coupled with the fact that the TS050s have an innate advantage through traffic thanks to the hybrid punch out of corners, means that Toyota doesn’t even have to push to its limits to win each race in formation, by multiple laps.

But, and it’s a big but, there is still time. There are rumblings in the paddock, and a real appetite for change. Rebellion Racing, SMP Racing, ByKolles and DragonSpeed have all turned up as promised, shown real loyalty, and effectively saved the class from fading away. So it wouldn’t be a surprise to see the second half to this season have a completely different feel.

Star Power
It’s not all doom and gloom. Not at all. While there is no known cavalry coming in LMP1 for the remainder of the FIA WEC ‘Super Season’ or indeed the 2019/20 season, there is cause for optimism, and part of it, is already within the championship. There is time for further change, and therefore some astonishing racing between the selection of drivers in LMP1, which arguably, has never been better. Should the ACO crack the EoT code, and get the privateers fighting for wins by Sebring, then we will have a real treat on our hands in 2019, with some of the world’s best drivers going toe-to-toe in a similar fashion to the golden years of the ALMS when Audi battled Penske, or when Pescarolo battled Audi at Le Mans.

FIA WEC

It is easy to forget that in LMP1 alone, we have two Formula One World Champions in Jenson Button and Fernando Alonso, competing against one another (though not on the track thus far!) in the same field as a WTCC champion in Jose Maria Lopez, a Formula E champion in Sebastien Buemi as well as multiple FIA WEC and Le Mans winners like Neel Jani, Andre Lotterer and now Kazuki Nakajima. If changes are made then the fabulous set of cars we have, can produce racing worth of the price of admission, and keep that level of drivers wanting to keep coming back for more. Because there is real potential here, it almost feels like the class is a sleeping giant. The cars are impressive, the driver crews are, we just need either the privateers to be allowed to breathe, or the Toyotas to be pegged back so we can have a title race that lasts until next Le Mans.

Real hope for the future
As for the future beyond 2019/20; well there’s green shoots, as the ACO and FIA prepare for the most important period in the World Endurance Championship’s short history – the months between the 2020 top class regulations being ratified in December, and the start of the 2020/2021 season. During that time, the future and fate of the championship may well be sealed. Will the factories come and adopt the new formula (hybrid-powered prototypes featuring heavy styling cues), or will the rule makers need a serious re-think once again about the shape and structure of the championship, which let’s not forget, still features a strong GTE Pro class with five manufacturers?

Let’s start with the 2020 yet-to-be-named ‘hypercar’ regulations, before diving into the zero-emissions target even further down the line. There is a big group of manufacturers known to be in the room, shaping the technical regulations and considering joining the new formula in 2020. This means that there’s plenty of scope to have a healthy grid. Of course, there’s no assurance that any of them will come, though Toyota seems certain, and Aston Martin has publicly stated that it is “very interested” in the potential. That’s without digging deeper into the other potential factories that have requested presentations and pitches at board level from the ACO and FIA. A defining factor of this whole formula will be cost, and the ACO and FIA seem confident that not only will the new formula prove cost effective for both factories and privateers, but also remain a proposition for aspirant factories or teams looking to join in after Year 1, due to the performance levels being contained and the fact that all hybrid systems have to be offered as off-the-shelf, cost-capped, systems to any competitor on the grid. The cars should look stunning, and set times not too far off the current LMP1s. And if a handful of teams commit, this could turn into a hugely successful formula. What is more, is that it won’t be long until the potential field for the 2020/21 season starts to take shape. “This is the first time ever that private teams will be able to purchase all of the elements of a hybrid prototype programme, off the shelf, and then be ultimately competitive,” Toyota’s technical director Pascal Vasselon said back at Fuji. “They will genuinely have that opportunity, with no performance gap between their cars to the factory teams. We have always pushed for the technology to be of the highest level but we have to accept that for the moment the first priority is to bring more competitors to the Championship. “And, we have said repeatedly that we are here for the long-term.”

As for the zero-emissions target, the foundations have been laid. We have seen the Project H24 Adess-based prototype turn laps at Spa-Francorchamps back in August, and a pit stop demo too. The technology for hydrogen power is coming, and it’s coming fast. That too, could breathe further life into the ACO’s top class come 2024, when there is the aim for teams running both zero emissions and hydrogen prototypes against one another. That will be sight to see!

GTE hotting up
It is safe to say that the start to the season saw a real imbalance in GTE Pro, with Porsche, Ford and Ferrari racing with a clear performance advantage over BMW and Aston Martin’s new machinery.
Now, with GTE racing, there’s always the question mark surrounding team tactics, and the impact of Balance of Performance, but Are the BMW M8s and Vantage AMRs good enough to win races and titles? The answer is yes, and we are starting to see just how competitive they can be, after strong showings from Aston Martin in certain conditions at Silverstone and Fuji, and BMW’s podium run in the last race.

FIA WEC

With Aston Martin and BMW up to speed, and the other three marques still just as competitive, we could be in for a barn-storming second half to the season. This is especially mouth-watering when you consider how much of it is left: we have Shanghai next week, then next year, Spa, and two rounds which award more than the standard haul of points at Le Mans at Sebring. “We’re just hitting our stride,” BMW driver Tom Blomqvist said after Fuji. “It has taken a while for the MTEK crew, which is new to the FIA WEC and endurance racing to get up to speed, but now we feel comfortable and know the car. Aston Martin look good now too, so the rest of the season should be really fun.”

The moments that mattered in the opening rounds
• Toyota Gazoo Racing’s No. 7 Toyota TS050 HYBRID was forced to start at the back of the field in the opening race of the season at Spa; penalized after setting pole in Qualifying for an incorrect declaration of its fuel flow meter. This was key for two reasons: One, it meant that the stars aligned and FIA WEC debutant Fernando Alonso was promoted to pole for his first race, which he would go on to win. And two, it showed just how much of an advantage Toyota had over the privateers. Despite the No. 7 starting from the pit lane, a lap behind the field in the race, it finished second, on the lead lap and two laps ahead of the privateer pack!

• G-Drive Racing’s antics at Le Mans have been a big talking point since June. The Russian-flagged team was found to have gained an unfair advantage in the pits during the 24 Hours by tampering with the fuel rig. This cost the team its Le Mans LMP2 class win the day after the race, and sparked an appeal and hearing process that would drag on until October. Alpine inherited the win as the result, but had to wait until the weekend at Fuji to celebrate. And they weren’t even awarded the original trophy, that’s supposedly still in Russia!

• Say what you will about Fernando Alonso, but he’s stayed classy, kept a smile glued to his face, and adapted quickly to life at Toyota since the start of the year. The two-time F1 champ came of age at Le Mans, embarking on a night stint in the No.8 during the Le Mans 24 Hours which ultimately turned the tide of the race and laid the foundations for the No.8 crew to win the race, scoring the Japanese marque a huge, momentous and historic result. It was certainly one of the more impressive drives we’ve seen at Le Mans in recent years. Also of note is that the Spaniard’s triple crown run is alive and healthy.

• The retro-liveried factory Porsches at Le Mans went down an absolute storm. As part of the 70th anniversary of the brand, the team put their corporate image and decision making to the side and went all out to impress the fans. That in turn translated into a lot of publicity and big win for the 911 RSR, which is easily one of the most impressive GT cars in the modern era. It looks the part, sounds incredible too, and in ‘Pink Pig’ colours, it looked fabulous, taking a controlling win after a metronomic run, which put Porsche in the driving seat of the GTE Manufacturers World Championship race, and scored the marque another famous win at the Grand Prix D’Endurance. Bravo!

FIA WEC

• Rebellion winning at Silverstone was a real landmark victory. Rebellion Racing’s No.3 R-13 officially scored the team its first overall FIA WEC victory and the first ever for a privateer in the championship, and the first non-hybrid win since 2012. It wasn’t in ideal circumstances (the team benefiting from Toyota losing its 1-2 finish for a skid plant infringement), but crucially it’s kept the title race tighter than you might imagine as the season wears on.

Voices in the paddock
“Obviously it wasn’t the ideal way to do it, but ultimately, winning a race is winning a race, no matter how it comes and we will grab this result with both hands,” Rebellion Racing’s Gustavo Menezes said after winning at Silverstone. “All the boys at Rebellion have worked so hard to get the whole LMP1 project off the ground and to develop the car to the stage where it is now, and they really deserve this 1-2 finish. I’m immensely proud of everybody involved in the programme.”

FIA WEC

“It’s a cool team,” Matt Griffin said when asked to reflect on his time spent driving with Clearwater Racing. “It’s a little bit like Reservoir Cats! Clearwater is a team where the people involved are very proud of what they can do. We have fun, we have crazy parties after the races. Weng loves his wine, and stuff like that. And that’s the thing, I’ve been with them since 2011. The only thing I would say though is that the Matt Griffin you might see at ELMS races, or in Blancpain, is different to the Matt Griffin with Clearwater. There’s a different vibe there, and it’s a team that relies more on sponsors and partners.”

“We’re not ruling anything out,” revealed Corvette Racing’s Doug Fehan when asked about his opinion on the 2020 regulations. “An overall win at Le Mans is a unique achievement, and when you look at the intent of the past efforts to create something unique, it became too expensive This move, to the credit of the sanctioning bodies, is to find something that’s more affordable and technologically representative of where you want to go, with proper brand identification, so it would stand a better chance of attracting manufacturers. But I’m sure that there will be manufacturers who continue to run both (GTE and LMP1). Porsche is a prime example, with a big customer race programme, and they’ve shown in the past that they can do both.”

“The atmosphere in the team is amazing. Everyone is really friendly,” Fernando Alonso said when asked about racing with Toyota. “We have a Whatsapp group and we are always chatting. We were taking pictures of each other today. The atmosphere is so friendly and so nice – this is one of the best things.”

“I have had a great career to this point, not only in F1 but also in the junior categories,” DragonSpeed’s Pastor Maldonado stressed when asked about his public persona. “I have won in every category I have raced in and I hope to carry that record forward into this new challenge. For me it is about the racing, about the driving I don’t care what people say, it’s part of the game. I just go out there, do my best and hope to win.”

“What a character, and what a legacy, a real innovator and a visionary,” Richard Dean said, when asked to pay tribute to the late, great, Dr Don Panoz. “He was a man who truly invested in the sport, in his series, his circuits and his cars. The American Le Mans Series showed the way, it is still my favourite race series. There are so many that owe their careers in this sport to the opportunities that Don’s investments and projects provided. At Le Mans (in 2006, with a Team LNT Esparante), it seemed coming into the race that everything was against us, engine issues at the test, we were allocated Garage 13, but his enthusiasm never wavered, he tried for 10 years to get the win and was just ecstatic when we did it. And he was given the Spirit of Le Mans award by the ACO that same weekend! I grabbed a Panoz flag from someone on my way to the podium, I see that picture every day in my gym. Without Don that wouldn’t have been possible, a simply huge part of my career.”

Written by Stephen Kilbey
Photography by Dailysportscar

Le Mans 2019

Le Mans 2019: Reserve your place now!

Le Mans 2019: On sale now

There are few events that people start planning the moment the previous one has finished. Christmas and the family holiday are probably on that list. Le Mans is definitely there.
Le Mans 2019 is already unique in that it will be the second Le Mans 24 hours in the one, not to be repeated, “Super-Season” of the FIA World Endurance Championship. From now on, the Le Mans 24 Hours will be the grand finale to a season that begins in September & October the previous year. If Le Mans could be any more important in the motorsport calendar, it will be now.

Le Mans 2019

Toyota dominated the 2018 race, but there was also a lot of positives to be taken from the new private teams, who now have the invaluable experience of a Le Mans 24 Hours under their belt. Expect some rule changes and “balance of performance” tweaks to enable the privateers to close the gap on Toyota at Le Mans 2019.

We know what to expect from the LMP2 battle. In 2018 we saw both a chassis war and tyre war mix up the grid, but it will perhaps be remembered for the controversy that saw teams disqualified after the podium presentation for tampering with their refuelling rigs. That was a shame for quite a few teams that either had their trophies taken away, or that missed out on that podium feeling in the first place. Hopefully lessons will be learnt by everyone before Le Mans 2019.

Le Mans 2019
The GTE Pro battle was exceptional in 2018 & there is no reason to expect it to be any different for Le Mans 2019. Porsche’s retro-liveried cars were instant fan favourites and were cheered on by thousands as every lap went by. However, they were pushed all the way by a mixture of the Ferrari & Ford with the new BMWs not far behind. The older Corvettes and the new Aston Martin Martins looked great, but lacked the performance to back it up, but a year on don’t expect the same results.

GTE Am continues to deliver. There was competitive racing, errors, moments of exceptional skill and a popular winner in the best performing car. What more can you ask for? Same again at Le Mans 2019 please!

Le Mans 2019

So now you know what to expect, why not join us track-side at Le Mans 2019? Travel Destinations are an official tickets agent for Le Mans 2019 and offer you the widest possible choice for you to stay at Le Mans and enjoy all the action. Here are just a few of the possible options:

Circuit Camping: Thousands of race fans camp at the circuit each year. Le Mans 2019 will be no different. The circuit run campsites such as Maison-Blanche, Tertre Rouge and Houx are all available through Travel Destinations. You will need to bring your own tent & expect to join a rowdy crowd at various locations around the track. Camping facilities will be basic at best but if you join in the party atmosphere you can have a great time.

Le Mans 2019
Private camping at Porsche Curves: Travel Destinations private campsite at the Porsche Curves remains hugely popular with race fans still wanting to camp, but preferring the added benefits of on-site security, serviced showers & toilets as well as hospitality marquee with café & bar exclusive to Travel Destinations customers. In addition, you also get the bonus of our very own exclusive viewing bank overlooking the fastest corner on the circuit!

Travel Destinations Event Tents: Our “Glamping” option is located across the other side of the track to our Porsche Curves campsite, but instead of having to bring your own tent, we provide a 5-metre diameter bell-tent, fully carpeted & complete with mattresses and all bed linen. The Event Tents benefit from security, serviced shower & toilet blocks as well as their own hospitality marquee for food and drink and all residents also have access to our private viewing bank at the Porsche Curves.

Le Mans 2019
Travel Destinations Flexotel Village: Each year we build a “pop-up hotel” in the centre of the circuit. This Flexotel Village provides customers with their own bedroom at the track. Each room comes with 2 proper beds & all bed linen and towels and you can choose from a standard room with shared facilities or your own ensuite room with shower & toilet. The atmosphere amongst the Flexotels is calmer & more relaxed than elsewhere on circuit, but there is still a hospitality marquee serving food and drinks all weekend for those what enjoy coming together with other like-minded race fans over a beer or a BBQ. All this is just a short walk from the paddock or Tertre Rouge corner.

Le Mans 2019
Hotel & chateaux offers: For some the lively nature of the busy circuit may be too much, so staying away from the circuit is a more comfortable option for them. Of course, there is the battle with traffic to get in to the circuit if you are driving, but some of our hotel options also have the option of using the excellent tram service to get to and from the track. Prices for nearby hotel rooms are not the cheapest options, but for those looking to enjoy the whole race week they are certainly a comfortable option.

Le Mans 2019
If you’re not sure which option is best for you, then why not call our team at Travel Destinations? Each member of staff has an intimate knowledge of Le Mans with multiple visits under their belts. They know the pros & cons of every option and will be happy to discuss the best option for you.

You can book Le Mans 2019 with Travel Destinations now. Early-bird prices are on our website and you can secure your place at Le Mans 2019 today with a small deposit.
Call us now on 0844 873 0203 to join us at Le Mans 2019.

Le Mans 2018

Le Mans 2018 tickets & travel on sale now

Le Mans 2018 tickets & travel are on sale now

The dust has just started to settle on what was a memorable Le Mans 24 Hours. Not only was the story of the race almost unbelievable at times, but the weather was hotter than most of us can remember. Just as soon as Porsche & Aston Martin were finished popping their champagne corks, we started thing about Le Mans 2018.

Travel Destinations are now open for bookings for all of our race options for the Le Mans 24 Hours 2018. Le Mans 2018 may be just under a year away, but now is the time to start planning to be track-side. All options are currently available to reserve with a small deposit, so please call us now on 0844 873 0203 to reserve your space. All our prices included travel from the UK, entrance tickets and your chosen accommodation option. International visitors are more than welcome, and prices are available without channel crossings where required. All of our private secure options at the circuit were sold out for this year’s Le Mans 24 Hours, so it is important to book early & avoid disappointment.

Le Mans 2018
The Travel Destinations private campsite on the Porsche Curves has always set the benchmark for camping at Le Mans. Positioned track-side, our campsite is unique at Le Mans in having its own private viewing bank overlooking the Porsche Curves. The campsite is open from Wednesday before the race until the Monday after the race & benefits from 24 hours security during this time. All guests will be welcomed by our campsite team and shown to their reserved pitch. The campsite has fully serviced showers and toilets and has a large hospitality marquee where food and drinks maybe purchased over the weekend. The marquee has large screen TVs showing the race and other sporting events live over the weekend so you won’t miss a thing at Le Mans 2018.

Le Mans 2018
Just a stone’s throw away from Porsche Curves are our Travel Destinations Event Tents. Commonly described as our glamping option, this area is dedicated to large pre-erected tents. Each tent is 5 metres in diameter and can sleep up to 4 people. The tent comes fully carpeted, with mattresses and all bed linen. The Event Tents are located in their own private secure area, with their own showers & toilets as well as a hospitality marquee. As well as this all guests will also have access to Travel Destinations’ private viewing bank and all the facilities at Porsche Curves. Glamping at Le Mans 2018 has never been so easy.

Le Mans 2018
The Travel Destinations Flexotel Village has gone from strength to strength in recent years. This pop-up hotel is perfect for those people who don’t want to camp, but still want to enjoy the convenience and atmosphere of staying in the centre of the circuit for Le Mans 2018. Each bedroom contains two proper beds and all bed linen & towels. In their own secure paddock, just a few minutes’ walk from the start line, the Flexotel Village also has fully serviced shower & toilet blocks, as well as a hospitality marquee serving high quality food and drinks throughout the weekend. For those who wish to upgrade there are also a limited number of Flexotel rooms with ensuite bathrooms available for a supplement. Secure parking is available in the Flexotel Village but it is also convenient for those people arriving train/tram, as the Antares tram stop is just around the corner.

Of course, there are also thousands of camping pitches in the ACO circuit run campsites available for Le Mans 2018. Although these areas offer only basic facilities & no security, they are always popular and most areas will sell out. Travel Destinations has the largest allocations of pitches in all circuit run campsites, particularly in the most popular areas of Maison Blanche, Houx and Tertre Rouge. For those looking to secure these campsites we always recommend booking early. Some of the larger campsites, such as Beausejour will have better availability, just because of their scale but for the best channel crossings and times, it is good practice to book early anyway.

Grandstand seats and race weekend hospitality are also available and can be added to any of our Le Mans 2018 packages. These are ideal if you would like to get a better view of the action, or just want a different experience. We can highly recommend the hospitality with our partners at Michelin.

You can secure all your Le Mans tickets for the Le Mans 24 Hours 2018 now. A deposit at this stage will secure your booking until balances are due 10 weeks before the event. As an ABTA bonded tour operator and an official agent of for Le Mans 2018 you know you can book with Travel Destinations with confidence.

The Le Mans Classic also returns in 2018. We offer all of our usual offers and more at the Le Mans Classic. You can witness cars from the 1920s right through to the 1980s take to the track that they once called home. Visit our Le Mans Classic pages on our website to learn more about the event and Le Mans Classic tickets.

Travel Destinations remain the leaders at Le Mans!

Le Mand tickets

Le Mans Tickets

You can book your Le Mans tickets now through Travel Destinations. The confirmed dates for the Le Mans 24 Hours are the 18th & 19th June 2016. Prices will be published later this year but the 2015 prices will remain on this website to use as a guide. The Le Mans Classic dates are confirmed as the 8th – 10th July 2016. Prices for this event are already available on this website.

For many the search for the right Le Mans tickets can be confusing. A quick search of the web can provide many contradictory opinions on the best way to obtain Le Mans tickets and what are the best Le Mans tickets to have. With this in mind we take a simple look below at the different options available and try to answer many of the questions about Le Mans tickets that we get asked every year.

When should I book Le Mans tickets?
The Le Mans 24 Hours is attended by more than 250,000 people each year. Clearly there is a big demand for Le Mans tickets. Generally ticket prices are published in the autumn, but it is still possible to make a provisional reservation before then. Travel Destinations opens provisional reservations the day after the race. This enables those returning from this year’s race to repeat their reservation if they wish. Generally we recommend booking Le Mans tickets before Christmas if possible. This will give you the best choice of availability and you shouldn’t miss out on what you want. Of course Travel Destinations still make bookings right up until the week of the race, but availability will be restricted the closer we get to Le Mans.

What Le Mans tickets do I need?
A lot depends on what you want to do and see, but the minimum that you require is a general admission / entrance ticket (“Enceinte General”) for every person in your party. This allows you pedestrian access to all the public areas of the circuit. This includes the village area and the viewing banks and steps between Porsche Curves and the Tertre Rouge Corner. It also allows access to the viewing areas at Arnage and Mulsanne corners which can be accessed by a free bus service from the main entrance to the circuit. In addition to the general admission ticket you can choose to add a grandstand seat ticket to your booking. This will give a you a reserved seat for the Saturday and Sunday. Even if you choose to have a grandstand seat you will still need to have a general entrance ticket. All Travel Destinations offers include a general entrance ticket.

Why should I book Le Mans tickets through Travel Destinations?
There are a number of companies that advertise selling Le Mans tickets, however you should only buy Le Mans tickets from the circuit itself or from an official Le Mans tickets agency. Travel Destinations are an official Le Mans tickets agency & have been working with the circuit for more than 20 years. Travel Destinations are also an ABTA and ATOL bonded tour operator enabling us to offer the best selection of travel and accommodation options for Le Mans. By being an ABTA and ATOL bonder tour operator you can make your booking with Travel Destinations knowing that your money is safe and that you can book with confidence. All Travel Destinations employees have been to Le Mans on many occasions and can talk to you from experience about what Le Mans is like and which ticket options are best for you. Travel Destinations staff are present at the circuit and offer a support service for all our customer.

How many Le Mans camping tickets do I need?
You will need at least one Le Mans camping pass for each vehicle that you are taking in to the campsite. One camping ticket generally entitles you to a 7m x 5m camping pitch. If you require more space then you can add additional camping tickets to your booking. Most of the campsites now have marked pitches and have numbered plots, however a few remain that are not numbered. Circuit run campsites are basic and have very few facilities. If you require better facilities such as security, fully serviced showers and toilets and a hospitality marquee, then we recommend the Travel Destinations private trackside campsite at the Porsche Curves.

What is the best grandstand ticket to have at Le Mans?
There is no right or wrong answer to this as it is really down to personal preferences and what you wish to see. You may not even need to add a grandstand seat depending on what you want to see. The majority of grandstands are located on the start-finish straight either above or opposite the pit lane. Being above the pits (tribune 34) gives a good view of the start and the finish, but you cannot see in to the garages. From the grandstands opposite the pit lane you will be able to see in to the garages as well. These are normally the most expensive and in demand seats. As an alternative you may look to try seats on the Ford Chicane (Tribune 23) or by the famous Dunlop Bridge (Tribunes 4 & 5) as these offer good views of the esses, curves or chicane. However you cannot see the garages from these stands.

Do I need to be a Le Mans member?
You can become a member of the ACO (the Automobile Club de l’Ouest) but it is not necessary to be a member to purchase Le Mans tickets through Travel Destinations.

Do you only sell Le Mans tickets to people in the UK?
Travel Destinations may be based in the UK but we sell Le Mans tickets to people from all around the world. Our largest market is the UK but we have many customers from all across Europe, USA, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Japan, China, Brazil and many other countries around the world. Although many of our prices include options for Channel crossings from the UK, all of these options are also available without UK travel if this is not required.

Do you sell Le Mans tickets on their own?
Travel Destinations is a tour operator and us such our offers include accommodation, tickets and usually travel. However our sister company is a ticket agency and so can sell the tickets on their own. Le Mans ticket only sales may not have the same availability as offers via Travel Destinations, but if this is the right thing for you please visit www.tickets-2-u.com for more details on individual Le Mans ticket prices.

What is the best way to book Le Mans tickets with you?
All of Travel Destinations Le Mans ticket offers are created bespoke for you. This means that we can tailor make each booking to your requirements, using our experience and understanding of Le Mans. The best way to do this is to speak with you, so we encourage everyone to contact us by telephone to discuss the best option available. We can then talk you through the process. From the UK the best number to call is 0844 873 0203 and from outside the UK you can call +44 1707 329988. If this is not possible then simple questions can also be asked via emailing info@traveldestinations.co.uk

We hope that whatever Le Mans tickets option you choose, that you can join Travel Destinations at the next Le Mans 24 Hours.