Category Archives: Le Mans News

Le Mans

Le Mans 2020 Update

Travel Destinations has announced today that it is continuing to sell travel packages for the 2020 running of the Le Mans 24 Hours in September (19-20), following yesterday’s update from the ACO which stated that the event will run with spectators track-side.

In terms of accommodation, in addition to booking customers ferry and tunnel crossings, Travel Destinations continues to offer its increasingly popular on-site glamping and Flexotel (temporary hotel) options, as well as a variety of camping options including its private on-site area situated trackside at the Porsche Curves (featuring access to TD’s private viewing bank). Hotel and B&B bookings off-site are still being offered too.

As for race tickets, while additional sales via the ACO have been postponed, as an official agent of the Le Mans 24 Hours Travel Destinations has an allocation of both general admission and grandstand tickets still available for customers.

Pop up hotel at Le Mans

Hospitality packages remain on offer too, with a variety of options from TD partner Michelin, as well as official ACO hospitality areas at the Porsche Curves and Start/Finish straight. These include options such as full catering, suite, paddock and grid walk access, VIP parking and shuttle bus services.

Anyone interested in attending the 2020 (and/or the 2021 running) of the race can contact Travel Destinations by calling one of our experts on 01707329988 (+44 1707 32 9988 for international callers) or emailing info@traveldestinations.co.uk.

Refund Guarantee
All bookings made are covered by the Travel Destinations’ Refund Guarantee

Le Mans vs Le Mans

With the Le Mans Classic returning in 2021, and Hypercars making their debuts at the 24 Hours of Le Mans in the same year, both events will be very appealing to all motorsport fans. But how do you choose which event is right for you? Here we look at the similarities and differences between the events to help you make the right decision for you.

Where
The Circuit de la Sarthe has hosted the Le Mans 24 Hours since 1923. The circuit has seen various modifications since then, but essentially it is the same place. Located to the south of the city of Le Mans, the roughly 8½ miles (13.6km) of track is made up of a combination of public & private roads. The Mulsanne straight, Arnage corner and Dunlop Bridge are all part of the famous circuit.

The Le Mans Classic takes place on exactly the same circuit as the modern event. The racing takes place on the same tarmac, featuring the same iconic straights and corners of the full Le Mans Circuit. It may take the cars longer to complete one lap of the famous Le Mans track, but it is the same track of the same length and in the same location.

When
Although the first 24 Hours of Le Mans was actually held in May, the traditional month for the race has been June (falling on the 24th week of the year). There have been exceptions, including 1956 when it took place in July and then 1968 and most recently 2020 when the race was postponed from June to September (19th & 20th). However, the Le Mans 24 Hours remains an annual event and is scheduled to take place in June every year, with 2021’s race scheduled for the 12th & 13th June.

The Le Mans Classic was introduced as an event in 2002 and takes place every two years, on the first weekend in July. The event was postponed in 2020 due to the pandemic, so the next event will take place from the 1st – 4th July 2021. The event organizers have already stated that they will keep the event taking place every two years, to ensure the quality of the competing cars is maintained. This raises the prospect of the Le Mans Classic also taking place in 2023, as part of the circuit’s centenary celebrations.

Le Mans 2021
Le Mans 24 Hours

The Cars
Around 60 cars take to the starting grid of the Le Mans 24 Hours each year. The cars are a mixture of prototypes and GT cars designed specifically with endurance racing in mind. The Le Mans 24 Hours is now a long sprint race, with cars able to complete a full lap in just over 3 minutes, even with rule changes designed to slow the cars down for safety reasons. 2021’s Le Mans 24 Hours will see the start of a new era in sportscar racing with the new Hypercar classification replacing the previous top-class of LMP1.

All cars that have previously participated in the Le Mans 24 Hours (from 1923 through to 2010) are now invited to join in the Le Mans Classic. This means that more than 500 competing cars will take to the track over the long weekend. Not all cars will race at the same time, so the 24 hours of racing is divided up in to different eras (grids or plateau) to equalize performance. Each era will then take to the track three times during the 24 hours period. Competition is fierce so scrutineering is strict, ensuring that the cars taking part are as close to the original specifications as possible, whilst those eras that included a Le Mans style start, will re-enact the event when they first take to the track.

Le Mans Classic
Le Mans Classic

Spectators
The official attendance at the Le Mans 24 Hours is regularly more than 200,000 people, making it one of the most attended events in the world, not just in motorsport. The circuit is large and so can accommodate this large number of people; having said that expect large crowds of people particularly along the start/finish straight both at the start of the race and the end, where spectators will also traditionally invade the track. Although mostly French, the Le Mans 24 Hours does attract a multinational audience. A large percentage of spectators will have travelled from the UK, Scandinavia and the Netherlands with smaller numbers travelling from the USA, Australia, South Africa and elsewhere around the world. In general, the Le Mans 24 Hours attracts a predominantly young adult audience, with large groups and a party-style atmosphere is common.

The Le Mans Classic has grown in size with each event with the official spectator numbers now well over 100,000. Despite being around half the number of the 24 hours, this is not a small event and in addition nearly 9000 classic cars will be driven to the Le Mans Classic and parked on the infield, creating the largest car-club gathering in the world. Whilst many of the grandstands will be full for the very first race, the Le Mans Classic has more of an ebb and flow to the crowd than the 24 Hours, so it rarely feels over-crowded. The Le Mans Classic attracts a wider age range than the 24 Hours of Le Mans, but it is equally multinational. A local audience will always be present, but motorsport enthusiasts from around the world travel to witness the Le Mans Classic, so expect to hear many accents from the UK and America, as well as other European countries. The Le Mans Classic tends to attract a more mature group of spectators, often in pairs (due to the predominance of two-seater sports-cars) and therefore a calmer atmosphere often prevails.

The Paddock
The paddock is the area behind the garages where the teams work during race week. Often typified by large lorries and team hospitality units at big events. At the Le Mans 24 Hours the paddock area has restricted access. Unless you are a VIP or have an invitation from one of the teams then you are unlikely to be able to enter the race paddock. There are various support race paddocks that you may be able to access with your general tickets, but the main race paddock has restricted access for health and safety reasons.

The paddock at the Le Mans Classic looks & feels a lot different to most race events. The Le Mans Classic paddocks are arranged by the different grids and include a tented garage for each participating car. With the appropriate pass (included in all Travel Destinations offers) you can have access to each paddock and get up close to all the cars. You are able to talk to drivers and mechanics as they continue to prepare or repair their cars. There is a loose dress-code for the Le Mans Classic paddock area, but this is rarely enforced. There is always something happening in the paddock area as cars are leaving or returning from the track all the time, so awareness of what is going on is important, but it is always a rewarding place to spend some of your time.

Le Mans 2021
Le Mans Classic Paddock

The Village
This is the commercial area just to the north of paddocks and garages, which at the Le Mans 24 Hours is home retail outlets for official race merchandise, branded team gear, as well as some cafés and bars. There are often car displays & other promotions around this area throughout Le Mans week. Usefully, considering its proximity to the shops, the village is also where you will find the only ATM on the circuit.

The village area at the Le Mans Classic appears to sprawl a bit wider and further than at the Le Mans 24 hours. As well as the official branded products, expect to find a diverse selection of retailers with goods from memorabilia, refurbished petrol pumps, to leather flying hats and goggles. There tends to be a vintage & artisan theme throughout, with a selection of big-name brands thrown in for good measure. There a car displays and themed concours competitions all within this area, which will take some time to explore if you can be dragged away from the on-track action.

Entertainment
If the action on the track is not enough fun for you then the Le Mans 24 Hours provides some additional activities that you may find entertaining. The funfair is located just south of the grandstands on the outside of the track. In particular that big-wheel provides an excellent vantage point for photography, especially at night. Alternatively, if you like your music with a background of engine noise, then on most evenings there are free concerts on the big stage adjacent to the Dunlop Bridge. Although many of the guest bands have a French slant, some are often International names such as Razorlight, Franz Ferdinand & Jamiroquai.

The Le Mans Classic provides its musical entertainment in the form of mobile jazz bands & vintage singers around the village area throughout the event. For something different there is also a drive-in cinema on the Bugatti circuit. The Bugatti circuit is also the home to a plethora of car clubs from all over Europe. It seems that every marque and brand is accommodated on the various twists and turns of the internal circuit. It is well worth a wander. The ultimate highlight for many attending the Le Mans Classic is the opportunity to drive their own classic or sports car around the famous circuit. Whilst some of the roads are usually open to the public, it is rare to get the chance to drive around the whole circuit (twice!). At £200 per car it isn’t cheap and helmets are compulsory, but for many the price is worth it for the hot brakes and big smile at the end.

Le Mans 2021
Travel Destinations Event Tents at Le Mans Classic

Accommodation
Camping has long been a tradition at the Le Mans 24 Hours. With such large numbers of spectators descending on the city of Le Mans, there is just not enough other accommodation available. Those hotel rooms that are available can become expensive and camping enables race fans to stay at the track. The circuit-run campsites provide good locations with basic facilities. In the last 20 years Travel Destinations has paved the way to more options with the introduction of secure track-side camping at Porsche Curves, private glamping tents and individual bedrooms within the circuit in our Flexotel Village.

Because spectators still number more than 100,000 at the Le Mans Classic camping is still looked on as the default option. Whilst there are some more hotel and B&B rooms available in the area, driving to and from the circuit can become tiresome if you are doing it every day. Travel Destinations continue to offer two private track-side campsites and our glamping site inside the circuit for those that enjoy staying under canvas. Alternatively, our Flexotel Village is also available for those that prefer a proper bed and a roof over their head.

Le Mans 2021
Travel Destinations Flexotel Village

Alternatives
The Le Mans 24 Hours is unique. It is not easy to compare it to any other motor race in the world. However, for a mix of great racing and entertainment, then the Nurburgring 24 Hours could offer a good alternative. Although there is no prototype racing, the mix of up to 200 GT cars on the grid makes for quite a spectacle. Using a combination of the Nurburgring’s F1 circuit and the famous Nordschleife makes a large circuit with some spectacular viewing opportunities. The dates for the race follow a German holiday, so move around from year to year, but for 2021 the race will take place from the 3rd – 6th June, so you could even make the Nurburgring 24 an appetizer to the main course of the 24 Hours of Le Mans the following week!

Historic racing is the fastest growing class of motorsport in Europe, and there are many events on the calendar that are worth your attention. The Monaco historic, Nurburgring Oldtimer Grand Prix and the Angouleme Circuit des Remparts are all very good. However, the Spa Classic is now an annual event from the same organisers as the Le Mans Classic. The beautiful setting of the Spa-Francorchamps circuit in the Ardennes, and some of the cars from the Le Mans Classic now racing on this historic circuit make this a favourite event. The Spa Classic feels like a little sister to the Le Mans Classic.

The 2021 calendar is already packed with some amazing events. The Le Mans 24 Hours and the Le Mans Classic will certainly be among the highlights. Can you attend both? Or which will you choose?
Reserve your place now by calling Travel Destinations on +44 (0)1707 329988.

Le Mans

Reasons to be Cheerful – Le Mans

My phone calendar has helpfully reminded me where we all should be next week. As we move into what would have been Le Mans week, many of us are filled with a longing for La Sarthe. You often don’t appreciate something until it’s gone, but we have always appreciated the spectacle that is Le Mans.

You don’t have to look far to find negativity regarding the future of Le Mans on websites, forums and social media groups. It has been there for a while, even before the pandemic. However, while it may not be fashionable right now, I would like to point out the positives and see if we can find some reasons to be cheerful. After all, the Le Mans 24 Hours will return and so will we.

2020

The virtual Le Mans event next week may be just a reminder of what could have been, but expect the ACO to be reminding everyone the real thing will return this September. Once it was apparent that the race couldn’t take place this June, the ACO was relatively quick to pencil in the 19th & 20th September for this year’s race. Initial doubts that this may still be too early to return to Le Mans, have now been replaced by belief that this will happen.

There are many political and business reasons why the race must take place, which I won’t go into here, but I can say that the noises from Le Mans, have gone from “If the race can go ahead” through “how the race can go ahead” to now “the race will go ahead”. I have no doubt now that the race will happen, but will we be able to be there?

We know that the ACO is currently liaising with the French government at various levels from local to national, to see what requirements will be required to make the race safe for everyone, including spectators. Those in charge will do their best to make that happen. Don’t get me wrong, Le Mans 2020 may not have the same crowds as previous races, but accepting that may be the best way forward. Expect further news soon, so watch this space….

2021

It is never too early to plan Le Mans. We already know that the Le Mans 24 Hours in 2021 will take place on the 12th & 13th June and you can already book your place through Travel Destinations (of course you can!). Why should we be looking forward to 2021?

This could be the start of a new era in sports car racing and you can be there at the beginning! Well nearly the beginning, as actually the new season of the FIA World Endurance Championship (WEC) is scheduled to start earlier in the year, with new machinery most likely making their debuts at Sebring in March. 2021 will see the entrance of Hypercar. The journey to get here is less important now. The cars will be here and racing.

At the time of writing we know that Toyota will be present. Their loyalty to Le Mans should be recognised by us all. We also know that they will be joined by two cars from Scuderia Cameron Glickenhaus for what has been dubbed by Jim Glickenhaus himself as a ‘David vs Goliath’ battle. In 2019 Toyota manufactured more than 10 million cars. Glickenhaus produced less than 400.

Does that mean that Glickenhaus cannot take the fight to Toyota and win Le Mans? It wouldn’t be the first time that we have seen something like that happen. Glickenhaus also has form when it comes to surprising doubters; just ask Jeff Westphal who took pole position for the American team with its in-house 003C at the Nurburgring 24 Hours a few years ago when up against the factory-backed GT3 cars from Audi, Porsche, BMW, Mercedes and Bentley.

We also know that ByKolles is likely to take to the grid with its new Hypercar too, so this could be the start of a new manufacturer competition at the front of the grid.

Le Mans
Toyota’s Hypercar

2022

Just when you have got over the excitement of seeing Hypercars race at Le Mans, you have something more to look forward to. The Le Mans 24 Hours in 2022 is set to be the first time you will get to see the new LMDh class go head-to-head with the Hypercar field, which is in-turn set to be bolstered by the return to Le Mans of Peugeot Sport.

The claims in recent years of tensions between the ACO and IMSA appear to be unfounded as the two bodies have come together and approved a global top class, paving the way for something truly special at Le Mans; a huge field of manufacturers fighting for the overall win, the likes of which we haven’t seen since the late 1990s.

Along with the possible addition of Peugeot to the Hypercar grid, there is a sizeable list of prospective manufacturers all currently evaluating LMDh programmes. Porsche, Mazda, Cadillac, Audi, Acura, Lamborghini and McLaren are all known to be ‘in the room’ and seriously considering their options. It is now a case of which marque makes the first move and gives a programme the green light, but it all looks promising.

2023

Back in 1923, André Lagache & Réné Léonard won the very first 24 Hours of Le Mans. Ultimately, they had two grandstands at the circuit named after them too. 2023’s centennial celebrations should be something not to be missed. A new pit-complex with future-proofed garages enabling the introduction of a Hydrogen class at Le Mans, set to be unveiled for 2023, is currently in the works.

Needless to say, a centenary of racing at Le Mans will be celebrated in a big way throughout 2023, and the Le Mans 24 Hours (and, we believe, the Le Mans Classic too) will be at the centre of it. It is certainly something to start looking forward to. The crowds will be huge and the manufacturers involved will all be more eager than ever to claim a historic victory.

We may not be able to watch racing at Le Mans next week, and of course that is disappointing, but look a bit further down the road and there are a lot of reasons to be cheerful.

Written by Richard Webb
Photography by Dailysportscar

Want to reserve your place at Le Mans in September 2020 or June 2021? Call the Travel Destinations team now on +44 (0)1707 329988.

Le Mans 2021

Le Mans 24 Hours 2020: Important Update

LE MANS 24 HOURS: IMPORTANT UPDATE

Today we have received the news that the Le Mans 24 Hours has been postponed and the new dates have now been confirmed as the 19th & 20th September 2020.

IMPORTANT

  • In the first instance, please do not call or email our office.
    In order to manage the volumes of correspondence we are receiving, we respectfully ask you to refrain from contacting us at this time. Rest assured we will be contacting you in due course in a systematic manner. This may well take some weeks in the current situation so your patience would be appreciated.
  • Reservations will be amended to the new dates, keeping the same price and travel arrangements as previously confirmed. Your new balance due date will be on or before 1st June.
  • Should you be unable to attend the Le Mans 24hrs in September, you are entitled to a credit note or refund for the full amount already paid. This must be redeemed by 24th December 2021 and is valid for any events until 30th September 2022.
  • As ABTA members we would like to re-assure you that any monies held with us are financially protected.

Please note that at this time the Le Mans Classic will continue to go ahead in July as planned.

Thank you for your understanding in this matter and we will be in touch very soon.

FIA WEC

A Positive future for FIA WEC, IMSA & Le Mans?

What should we take away from the race weekend last week? That all-eyes are firmly on Super Sebring next month.

If the convergence announcement in Daytona was the appetiser, then Super Sebring’s LMDh technical regulations reveal will be the main course. The dessert in this metaphor will be any big announcements from OEMs that follow.

Where does IMSA-ACO convergence currently stand after Aston Martin announced that its Valykrie-based Le Mans Hypercar programme will be ‘paused’ you ask? It’s an interesting question, and one that is not easy to answer.

Le Mans Hypercar will soldier on. Toyota stressed to the media during the CoTA weekend that it is continuing as planned with its programme. Its new car is in the process of being built; the parts are being manufactured as we speak, with Toyota Gazoo Racing’s technical director Pascal Vasselon telling Travel Destinations that it remains on course to take its car testing twice before the FIA WEC official test at Silverstone ahead of the 2020/21 season opener.

The question mark surrounds the Japanese giant’s competition.

ByKolles is believed to be on course to bring its car to Silverstone to start the season (though any rumours surrounding the Austrian privateer team should be taken with a grain of salt). Glickenhaus on the other hand is now unlikely to make the races in the 2020 calendar year, and will instead debut its 007C at Kyalami in 2021.

Then there’s Peugeot. The Rebellion partnership is no more, but the French constructor is still certain to join the fun, the only question is which route it will take. Its programme is in an embryonic stage (set to debut in 2022), so senior management will be looking closely at the potential of the LMDh formula compared to Le Mans Hypercar, as it could still change to taking the route that IMSA proposes for its FIA WEC effort and still go racing without any delays.

FIA WEC

While none of this is hugely positive news, the powers at be at the FIA WEC are pressing on, disappointed, but not panicking about the state of next season. There are plenty of potential solutions, many of them being brainstormed now, to ensure that the top class isn’t a one-horse race. But much more of the creative and positive energy is being poured into the LMDh technical regulations.

Travel Destinations understands that there is still an abundance of manufacturers (some truly surprising) either ‘in the room’ when it comes to the IMSA Steering Committee gatherings, with multiple close to committing to the new formula. The issue here is that the cavalry is not set to arrive until the 2021/22 FIA WEC and IMSA 2022 seasons. However, that will not matter in the eyes of both governing bodies if the factories announce programmes in numbers this year.

There are two Steering Committee meetings remaining ahead of Sebring, one in Daytona this week, the other the week before Sebring, in Sebring. On the agenda is discussions surrounding the finishing touches on the announcement that will be made. The game of poker between the interested parties will begin to enter its final stages once these meetings are adjourned.

We don’t quite know what LMDh cars will look like, though we do know that this is meant to be an evolution of the successful DPi formula. The cars that hit the track will be prototype-based, with each constructor partnering up with an existing LMP2 chassis supplier. They will feature a spec hybrid system to reduce costs and (with more aerodynamic freedom) styling cues that IMSA and the FIA WEC hope will make the cars look more like road-going models than the current DPi challengers.

So much weighs on this set of regulations. With Aston gone (and while it says it has only ‘paused’ its effort, there is widespread belief in the paddock that it is highly unlikely that we’ll ever see the Valkyrie race), it now appears that every single car racing beyond this year in the WEC and IMSA’s top class will be prototype based. This is actually a good thing in some ways, as it will make it easier to balance the two formulas (LMDh and LMH). With nobody going down the ultra-expensive route of converting a road car into a race car, the budget levels should also be far more achievable for everyone involved.

Programmes, as ever, will not be cheap, but in the current automotive landscape, where programmes have never been harder to sign off, reducing costs necessary. The ability to take a pre-existing chassis, and race it with a bespoke (likely GT3-based) engine, with a spec hybrid system has real appeal while we wait for the next wave of technology (all-electric/hydrogen) to develop into something capable of being used in high-performance endurance racing.

FIA WEC

The window to do this is now, the opportunity to allow factories to build one car to race globally, at all the major IMSA and WEC sportscar races doesn’t come around often. So it must be grasped at. The FIA, ACO and IMSA know this.

““This week was a difficult week. We are working like crazy. When I’m thinking about Sebring, I have a weekly meeting with John (Doonan) on the phone, and Sebring will be amazing. I’m hopeful of a very good announcement of LMDh, that will be fantastic for the sport,” FIA WEC CEO Gerard Neveu told Travel Destinations, and select media at CoTA.

“We just learned a few days ago about the Aston Martin decision. We have working group sessions with Pierre (Fillon) and a few people in the ACO and FIA, so for sure you will have an exact definition of what will happen next year in the FIA WEC before we open the entry registration.
“At the same time, our first priority now is to deliver the convergence strategy at Sebring. How this announcement is received will give us an indication of how the championship will be in 2021, and will give us a chance to decide the format for 2020.

“The WEC will be here in 2020, no question and we will work on very small modifications and adaptations, the final configuration. You can understand that this discussion will involve the ACO, FIA, Toyota and a few others around the table. It’s too early to tell you something today. We are putting everything into Sebring.”

So now we wait. The plans are in motion to create something truly spectacular. We haven’t seen more than four factory teams racing in the top class of sportscar racing at a race like Le Mans for decades.
Right now it would be easy to look at the current state of sportscar racing and see only negativity. But things can change remarkably quickly. If the announcement next month is, as it is expected to be, well received by the OEMs interested, then announcements will come quickly. The prospect of something truly remarkable, the likes we haven’t seen in international sportscar racing since the Group C era, all of a sudden can become real.

Written by Stephen Kilbey
Photography by Dailysportscar

Le Mans Classic

Photography workshops at Le Mans Classic 2021

Photography workshops at Le Mans Classic 2021

Le Mans photosExclusive to Travel Destinations; make the most of your Le Mans photos by adding Jessops Academy photography workshops to your Le Mans Classic booking.

Whether you are a novice looking to improve your photographic technique, or if you consider yourself a proficient amateur but are interested in a new perspective on your Le Mans photos, then these courses, run by our partners at Jessops Academy are perfect for you. Watch their video here.

Le Mans photos
Jessops Academy trainers at Le Mans

Following the success of the workshops from Le Mans 24 Hours, the Jessops Academy team will once again return to Le Mans to impart their knowledge to you first hand. The award winning Jessops Academy trainers will be hosting workshops at the circuit across race weekend, to offer everyone the opportunity to learn new techniques, understand how to get the best from your equipment  and generally achieve better Le Mans photos.

Le Mans Classic 2020
Making the most of different light

“The Jessops photography courses were fantastic. It was relaxed, informative and resulted in some great Le Mans photos!” – Jordan V.
“I have been taking photos at motorsport events for years, but Pete challenged me to try something different. And you know what; he was right.” – John B.
“As someone new to photography, I found the quality of instruction so clear and helpful – encouraging me to explore beyond “Auto”. Everyone in my group contributed something. It was great to learn from other people’s experiences” – Graham P.  

Le Mans photos
Track-side tuition from Jessops Academy staff at Le Mans

With a maximum ratio of 15 people to one trainer, these fun and informative workshops will enable everyone to receive first hand tuition from the professionals. Each workshop will focus on different skills, circuit locations and are specifically designed to achieve great photos at Le Mans. As well as the trackside sessions there are also opportunities to talk about camera set up, settings and equipment before heading out as well as chance to review the photos taken afterwards, all away from the noise of the track.

Le Mans Classic 2021 Photography workshops with Jessops Academy
Workshop 1. Camera set-up and control for motorsport photography including a welcome BBQ. (Friday, 6pm – 9pm) £110.00 per person
Workshop 2. Mastering movement, panning shots trackside, editorial shooting & paddock (Saturday, 10am – 1pm) £100.00 per person
Workshop 3. Paddock, Dusk light & light trails (Saturday, 8pm – 11pm) £100.00 per person
Workshop 4. Dawn & sunrise at Le Mans. The perfect time of day for Le Mans photos (Sunday 4:30am – 7am) £100.00 per person
Workshop 5. Reviewing images. Problem solving and post production editing (Sunday 11:00am – 12:30pm) £75.00 per person

Special Offer: Purchase all 5 workshops for just £330.00 per person

Le Mans Classic 2020
In the paddock at the Le Mans Classic

All Jessops photography workshops can be added to your Travel Destinations Le Mans booking. Please just mention which workshops you wish to join at the time of booking. Payment for all workshops will be required at the time of booking.

Spaces on each workshop are strictly limited so please secure your place by calling Travel Destinations now on 01707 329988.

Le Mans photos
Expert advice track-side

Further information & tips:
– Jessops photography workshops are open to all Travel Destinations customers at Le Mans. They can be added to existing & new bookings.
– The workshops are designed for photographers of all standards and experience.
– Workshops will take place regardless of weather conditions. You should be prepared to protect yourself and your camera from the elements.
– Le Mans is a large circuit so walking is involved. You should wear comfortable shoes & be prepared to kneel or lie down to get the best angles.
– A digital SLR or mirror-less camera is recommended for all workshops. Workshops will still be relevant for compact and bridge cameras, however the obtainable results will be limited by the technology.
– Bringing at least two different lenses with your DSLR is recommended. Particularly a wide-angle lens and a form of telephoto (3 – 600mm).
– A tripod or monopod will be useful for low light sessions.
– It will be possible to hire different equipment prior to the your visit to Le Mans should you wish.
– You should expect to take a large number of photos during each session. Please ensure you have enough memory cards and battery life.
– Each trackside session will take place in public areas around the circuit. Media access is not necessary and is not included.
– Trackside locations are inevitably noisy. If you are sensitive to noise, ear defenders or earplugs are recommended.
– Due to advance financial commitments, all workshops are non-refundable.

Reserve your place on the Jessops Academy photography workshops at Le Mans Classic 2021 by calling Travel Destinations now on  01707 329988.

Le Mans Classic
Getting the best from night-time photography

Le Mans

The future at Le Mans

The Future at Le Mans

Upon reflection, the 2019 Le Mans 24 Hours was significant. Not necessarily for the racing, which at times was spectacular, but for what the week showed us about the future of top-level sportscar racing and the forthcoming 2019/20 FIA World Endurance Championship season which starts in August. From the ACO Press Conference held before the race, until the flag on fell on Sunday afternoon crowning the winners, a picture was painted of what is to come in Le Mans 2020 and beyond.

Much of the talk in the paddock surrounded the 2020/21 season, which will mark the beginning of the new ‘Hypercar Prototype’ era. But, before the ACO confirmed that the new regulations have been finalised, it revealed next year’s FIA WEC entry list, which is 33 cars strong for the full season. And it is a very strong selection of cars that are set to take on, what many would assume will be a rather forgettable season. But, after the Le Mans 24 Hours we’ve just seen, the next campaign looks to have real potential.

Le Mans

The key for many, will be the competitiveness of the LMP1 class. What we saw at La Sarthe marked tremendous progress, with Rebellion and SMP challengers producing blistering lap times and battling with each other throughout the race. Were the privateers able to keep tabs with Toyota come race time? Not quite. Though there are real signs of improvement.The lap time produced by SMP Racing’s fastest BR1 AER in qualifying was quicker than any Audi or Porsche LMP1 time, and Rebellion with its developmental Gibson engine was able to get close to matching that. A year on from the cars’ Le Mans debut, the raw performance was sublime and the reliability is certainly getting there. It made for a race for third overall that kept everyone guessing throughout. It looked for much of the race, especially after the No.17 SMP Racing AER had an off during the night, that Rebellion Racing would take the final podium spot on offer, but a series of errors and mechanical issues meant its chances faded late in the race for the Swiss team, leading to its Russian rival taking third.

At Toyota, there was an inter-team battle which came down to the final hour of the race when a sensor issue diagnosed a puncture, but for the wrong tyre on the leading No.7 TS050 HYBRID. This caused the Toyota team to pit Mike Conway, Kamui Kobayashi and Jose Maria Lopez’s car twice for two unscheduled tyre changes, dropping the car to second. Hearts sank in the garage, after such a commanding performance could only produce a second place finish, behind Fernando Alonso, Kazuki Nakajima and Sebastien Buemi who took a second win at Le Mans and the World Drivers’ Championship in the process. It was strange to see an LMP1 podium at Le Mans such little jubilation shown from the winners.

Next season, with a fresh approach to balancing the cars in the top class, the ACO hopes we will see the privateer pack (which will include a pair of Team LNT Ginetta G60-LT-P1’s, now powered by AER engines) go head-to-head with Toyota after further development to their cars. Toyota does too, as such dominance, after a while, doesn’t add any further value to its programme ahead of its 2020/21 ‘Hypercar’ Programme.

Le Mans

And Toyota has now formally committed to a ‘Hypercar Protoype’. The Japanese marque one of two makes that are set to do battle in the first year of the new regulations. Toyota continuing its programme isn’t much of a surprise, as it has made it clear for over a year now that should the regulations support development of a hybrid system, it would carry on its sportscar programme. Thus we have Toyota Gazoo Racing hybrid-powered protyotypes, which will be styled to look like the forthcoming GR Super Sport Concept to look forward to. Excited? Those behind the programme certainly are, after a long wait for the regulations to be finalised.

The other factory that will take part is Aston Martin. The British marque is set to return to the top class of sportscar racing for the first time since prior to the Hybrid era began. Its last attempt at overall Le Mans glory was forgettable, with the AMR-One prototype not worthy of the brand’s rich history. But the brand looks very different now, inside and out, and this programme will bring together multiple parties associated with its motorsport commitments, who are all capable of delivering the goods. Aston Martin will race “at least two” non-hybrid, V12-powered Valkyries, designed by Adrian Newey, the man behind Red Bull Racing’s successes in F1, with financial support from AF Racing, which runs its new DTM programme and has been competing in the GT3 ranks in recent years. The new Aston ‘Hypercar’ programme will not affect Prodrive’s current GTE effort, which continues to win races in the FIA WEC’s GTE Pro class up against other factories. And that’s huge news, as GTE has taken a hit with the confirmed departure of both BMW and Ford in the past two months.

Le Mans

But the FIA WEC’s long-term viability will hinge on the success of its top class, which looks set to be filled with both factory and privateer teams, Glickenhaus and ByKolles are currently still insistent that they will race too. Beyond Year 1, further manufacturers are expected to join too. McLaren is still on the verge of green-lighting a programme and Porsche is also deep into the evaluation process. And that is just two of the brands still ‘in the room’.

Where does all this leave the other classes? LMP2 will continue to be healthy. Eight cars are on the FIA WEC entry for next season, with another strong set of drivers expected to do battle for some of the more professional prototype teams in the world. There’s a real chance that when ‘Hypercar Prototype’ takes over, then the current LMP2 cars will need to be slowed, as the pace of the ACO’s new breed are not expected to be capable of matching the supreme pace of the current LMP1s. And that’s OK, if the racing is exciting, and the formula attracts a strong number of entries, then few will complain. This will be especially true if the rule-makers can find a way to allow IMSA DPis to come and play at Le Mans and fight the ‘Hypercar Prototypes’ for the overall win. The performance window is similar and Scott Atherton insists that IMSA and the ACO’s relationship “is as strong as its ever been”.

What about GTE? Well Porsche, Ferrari and Aston Martin are all still committed with factory teams. Will Corvette bring its new C8R to Le Mans, which is currently being developed to the world stage? Unlikely, but there’s certainly a chance of some guest entries here and there. Luckily the customer ranks of GTE are booming. GTE Am will be the biggest class in the FIA WEC field next season, and the level of interest is showing no signs of waning.

After months of rumours, speculations and negativity as the ACO and FIA have put together its plans for the years ahead. We have heard positivity and plenty of it. Of course this has all come later than most would have liked, and both Aston Martin and Toyota will have to work unbelievably hard in the background during the next FIA WEC season to ensure it can make the start of the 2020/21 season with its new cars. But, a grid is forming, and if Aston Martin can take the fight to Toyota when it takes this bold step, then a new era will begin, and others will likely follow their lead.

Written by Stephen Kilbey
Photography by Dailysportscar

Don’t miss your chance to be track-side for the final season of the LMP1 class
The Le Mans 24 Hours 2020 is on sale now. Read more about our offers here.
Join us at the FIA WEC & IMSA Super Sebring 2020

Le Mans 2019

Le Mans 2019: The Result

Toyota win Le Mans 2019 but not with the right car

The Le Mans 24 Hours 2019 had stories unfolding from the start to the finish. It was predictable and unpredictable at the same time, if that is possible. A crowd of 252,000 spectators were kept enthralled for the full 24 hours as the story of Le Mans 2019 unfolded. The history books will say that Toyota won Le Mans 2019 comfortably, as was predicted before a wheel turned at the famous Le Mans circuit. However, there was so much more that went in to this race than just a Toyota Win.

Late drama sees the No. 8 Toyota take the win
Toyota dominated Le Mans 2019. No one can argue that. As the sole manufacturer with a hybrid in the top class, it was going to be a big surprise if they didn’t. Even Toyota’s harshest critic would have to recognise that both their cars performed amazingly well. They continued lapping in the 3m20s throughout the 24 Hours and were reliable (almost) until the very end. That alone is impressive and should be acknowledged. It is not their fault they had little competition. From the very start, the No. 7 car of Conway, Kobayashi & Lopez were the quickets. In particular Mike Conway managed to get something extra from the No. 7 car. The No. 8 car of Buemi, Nakajima & Alonso followed behind, except where pit cycle rotation gave them the lead. As the race played out the No. 7 Toyota retook the lead after 2am and didn’t relinquish it until the final hour. Then there was drama.

Le Mans 24 Hours

With less than an hour to go in Le Mans 2019, the No. 7 car overtook a GT car and had to move off the racing line to do so. They had done this many times throughout the race, but this time they picked up a slow puncture. They were far enough ahead of the sister car, that they could afford to pit and still come out in front. For whatever reason, a decision was made to only change the punctured tyre and not replace the full set. As the No. 7 car rejoined the race, there was a problem as the car was still registering a puncture. Apparently there was a sensor problem and the wrong tyre had been changed so the No. 7 car had to return to the pit lane again. This stop, combined with the slow running with a puncture, allowed the sister Toyota to catch and pass the No. 7 car. Although the No. 7 car returned to the race, there was not enough time to catch the No. 8 car again. The No. 8 car completed 384 laps of the Le Mans circuit and took the chequered flag to win the Le Mans 24 Hours 2019.

Elsewhere in LMP1 there was a great race between SMP Racing & Rebellion Racing for the unofficial privateers crown (and 3rd place in Le Mans 2019). With two cars each it was a very fair fight which saw both ahead of each other at different stages. In the end the No. 11 SMP Racing outlasted the Rebellion pair after the No. 3 car had a major incident in to a tyre wall. That both Rebellions still finished is a statement to the professionalism of the team, but it was SMP Racing that got to stand on the podium alongside Toyota.

 Signatech-Alpine conquer Le Mans 2019 
In such a crowded class with similar technology it was always going to be difficult to predict a winner in LMP2 for Le Mans 2019. The race saw special performances from the No. 29 Racing Team Nederland team that came back from multiple punctures and broken suspension after a collision with the wall.  Dragonspeed were impressive early on and looked to be a contender until Maldonado crashed the car before sunrise. The class outfits (with much FIA WEC experience) were G-Drive Racing and Signatech-Alpine. The two teams were battling together from the very beginning. It appeared that G-Drive had got themselves ahead in the early hours of the morning only for a technical glitch on a routine pit stop, find them unable to restart the car. The following 20 minutes spent in the garage cost them at least a podium place. So it was left to Signatech-Alpine to dominate the final stages and finish ahead of Jackie-Chan DC Racing and TDS Racing who kept going until the end.

Le Mans 24 Hours

Ferrari step up to take GTE Pro at Le Mans 2019
In many ways this was the class to watch throughout the race. Particularly at the start there were often five different manufacturers all in a line, following each other down the Mulsanne Straight. The lead changed multiple times and often the pit lane was a battle ground as stops happened simultaneously. The race was a disappointment for Aston Martin Racing. having qualified on pole, they were hit by Balance of Performance adjustments, that left them unable to manage tyres and ultimately compete. After a couple of hours they were dropping fast down this competitive field and an accident eventually put paid to their challenge. BMW. in their last Le Mans for the time being, also failed to make an impact. So it was left to Corvette, Ford, Porsche and Ferrari to battle it out. And this they duly did. Corvette surprised many in the last outing of the C7.R and were ahead for long stints in the first half of the race.  However, one too many off track excursions ultimately cost them a podium. Ford were always there and challenging. Their numerical supremacy of 4 cars enabled them to extend their challenge, but this wasn’t to be their year. In the end it was the familiar sight of Porsche and Ferrari who got to decide the podiums. In the end it was the underestimated Ferrari team of AF Corse (a factory team in all but name) that came through to claim the top step. The Porsche GT team were always keeping them honest, but going in to the last hour the Ferrari had built a comfortable lead and were never really challenged as the end of the race approached.

Le Mans 24 Hours

Purple is the colour for Keating
So often overlooked, the GTE Am class, once again, provided an excellent spectacle. initially it looked like a Porsche was the car to have. Both Dempsey-Proton cars started the race well and were closely followed by the Gulf Racing Porsche.  As the race went on, the Project 1 Porsche appeared to get stronger and also came to the fore. However, as incidents thinned the challengers, it was the No. 85 Ford GT of Keating Motorsports that broke the Porsche stranglehold. The purple liveried Ford driven and managed by American Ben Keating, survived a late challenge by Team Project 1 that saw the gap reduced to 10 seconds in the last hour, after damage to the car meant a change of nose for the Ford. However, they managed to stay out in front and hold on for an emotional victory for the whole team.

Le Mans 24 Hours

The new FIA World Endurance Championship season begins again in August at Silverstone, and will end at Le Mans 2020. The Le Mans 24 Hours continues to deliver stories and on-track action that makes it the most famous race in the world.

Written by Richard Webb
Photography by Dailysportscar

 

Le Mans 2019

Le Mans 2019: Qualifying Review

Toyota cruise & Aston Martin sprint to Le Mans 2019 poles

Qualifying for Le Mans 2019 came to an end at midnight on Thursday evening, although the celebrations for some went on in to the early hours of Friday morning. The headlines were grabbed by the No. 7 Toyota who took overall pole position with a fastest time of 3m15.497s. They finished ahead of their sister car, with the No. 8 car completing the front row. It can be argued that the difference between starting first and second in a 24 hours endurance race is of little significance, but Kobayashi, Lopez & Conway were happy to celebrate in front of the cameras. In reality the point they receive for pole position narrows the gap to the No. 7 crew who still lead the FIA WEC Championship by 30 points.

Le Mans 2019

Perhaps more significant for the top LMP1 class was the performance of the 3rd placed No. 17 SMP Racing car. Not only were they the first of the non-hybrid (privateer) cars, but they were impressively quick. Not only was their qualification time 3 seconds quicker than this time last year, but it was also quicker than the factory hybrid Porsche 919s and Audi R18 that preceded it. Paul Truswell, the much respected statistician at Radio Le Mans, calculated that if all cars ran without problems for 24 hours, then the Toyotas would have a 28 minutes gap to the next nearest car. However, Le Mans is rarely without problems, many of which take longer than 30 minutes to repair. So Toyota will be still be looking over their shoulders come the start of Le Mans 2019.

Le Mans 2019

There was a certain amount of controversy in the LMP2 qualification, with the No. 39 Graff Racing car initially setting the fastest lap time. However, the team were stripped of their times by the stewards after the chequered flag, after the car failed to stop and a mandatory weighbridge. So the official pole position in the LMP2 class was inherited by the No. 28 TDS Racing car in the early hours of the morning. This was a costly error by Graff Racing and the celebratory champagne had to go back on the ice as they will try to redeem themselves during the race.

Le Mans 2019

Some of the best qualifying action was witnessed in the GTE Pro class, which regularly saw 4 different manufacturers occupying each of the 4 fastest time slots.  In the end, and with the clock ticking down to midnight, it was a clear track for the No. 95 Aston Martin Racing with Nicki Thiim at the wheel that enabled them to complete a hot lap and take pole in this class. The qualifying result saw Aston Martin finish ahead of Ford and then Corvette in the top three. Perhaps surprising was the relative speeds for Porsche & Ferrari who qualified further down the order.

Le Mans 2019

By contrast Porsche completed a 1-2-3 in the GTE Am class, with No. 88 Dempsey-Proton Racing 911 RSR, claiming pole. The No. 77 sister car claimed second place on the grid with a remarkable turnaround seeing the No. 86 Gulf Racing Porsche claim 3rd. Gulf Racing looked out of the equation during the qualifying sessions, as they experienced gear-box issues. however, some sterling work by their pit team managed to get the car back on the track late in the last qualifying session and with enough time to set the 3rd fastest time. This relegated the No. 84 Ferrari 488 of JMW Motorsport to 4th on the GTE Am grid.

The weather looks set fair for the race on Saturday & Sunday and if the Le Mans 2019 qualifying sessions were anything to go by then we should be in for an exciting Le Mans 2019.

Written by Richard Webb
Photography by Dailysportscar

 

Le Mans 2021

Le Mans 2019: Preview

Le Mans 2019; it is time for the ‘Super-Season’ finale

After 62 hours of racing across seven rounds, the FIA WEC 2018/19 ‘Super Season comes down to this; the finale at the 87th running of the Le Mans 24 Hours. This season has had everything; close racing, drama, controversy, stars in fast cars, new machinery, dominant performances and it all ends here at Le Mans 2019.

It is easy to overlook Le Mans 2019 as the end of the current FIA World Endurance Championship season, as the Le Mans 24 Hours is an international mega-event and in many ways still stands alone. But much of the teams and drivers within the record 62-car field will be fighting not only for their places in the history of this great motor race, but for points and titles. Quite how the race will pan out with teams factoring in all important hauls of points, is a real unknown. But it can only add to the drama and intrigue that goes with Le Mans 2019.

So just how has the ‘Super Season’ panned out? and what can we expect out of the title battles? Well it all started in May of 2018, at the 6 Hours of Spa-Francorchamps, which was a race that, looking back, served as a real taste of what was to come. LMP1, understandably, has been dominated from the off by the sole remaining factory team in the class, Toyota Gazoo Racing. It’s pair of thoroughbred, near bullet-proof TS050 HYBRIDs, driven by six world-class drivers, this year including Fernando Alonso, have been winning convincingly. And aside from a slip up at Silverstone where both Toyotas were excluded post-race, it has been one-way traffic.

Now, the debate surrounding Toyota’s dominance has been somewhat all consuming throughout the season, but the reality is, that whatever the ACO and FIA do to balance the cars (and it’s efforts thus far have been far from perfect), the non-hybrid privateer cars are just not ready yet to go toe-to-toe with Toyota’s tried and tested, cutting edge machines. Rebellion, SMP, DragonSpeed and ByKolles’ efforts haven’t been in vein, and at times the sheer determination from all parties has been nothing short of admirable, but they’d need a lot more development time and money to sniff wins regularly.

Le Mans 2019

That is not to say that Le Mans 2019 can’t throw up surprises, because it Le Mans often does; just ask Toyota, which until last year had a history of spectacular blunders to its name. The 2018 Le Mans 24 Hours almost went ‘too’ smoothly for the Japanese marque, which in search of its first Le Mans win was able to take a controlled approach, with no other brands throwing huge resources at the event. Le Mans 2019  may prove to be different though, as the privateer cars have had a season’s worth of work completed on them, which will help in the reliability department. And it’s been a cocktail of fragility, along with costly driver errors, that have prevented some of the races from being more competitive. If a couple of the chasing pack can keep it clean, and Toyota hits any sort of trouble, then it will be game on. If not, it will be an inter-team battle between the No.7 and The No.8 to decide which trio is crowned World Champions and Le Mans winners. The battle for third place therefore, will be the one to watch in the class. Unless of course, reliability issues hit Toyota as they did at Spa, where the No.7 spent time in the garage with an electrical issue.

The LMP2 category on the other hand has been far more entertaining on track, as Jackie Chan DC Racing and Signatech Alpine have been locked in a season-long battle for the title lead. As it stands it’s advantage Alpine. For Alpine’s trio, consistency has kept them in it. Nicolas Lapierre, Andre Negrao and Pierre Thiriet won the class at Le Mans last year and have been on the podium at every other race. JCDC’s No.38 crew of Gabriel Aubry, Stephane Richelmi and Ho-Pin Tung, meanwhile, trail by just four points after wins at season opener at Spa, Silverstone and Shanghai as well as a second-place finish at Fuji. The big blow came at Sebring, where they could only muster a sixth-place finish after a troubled race on grueling Floridian circuit. At Spa too, in the weather chaos they wouldn’t finish ahead of the Alpine. Can they bounce back at Le Mans 2019, and for one last time pull a win out of the bag and win the title? It’ll be a story line well worth following.

Elsewhere in the full-season WEC LMP2 field, while there are no other contenders for the championship. There is the intrigue of DragonSpeed’s Pastor Maldonado and Anthony Davidson-led ORECA, which has finished on the podium the last three races and looks primed for a big result after a maiden win at Spa, and the new-look No.37 JCDC squad. A mid-season driver crew change for the No.37 car has eliminated it from the title race, but the addition of Briton Jordan King, American IMSA ace Ricky Taylor and super Gentlemen driver David Heinemeier Hansson to the field means further depth for the class. And it’s a class which oozes quality and now features 20 cars at Le Mans 2019 since the late surprise announcement that two extra garages will be built for the race.

For those of you track-side at Le Mans 2019 it is the GTE ranks, that will provide much of the excitement and drama, and for good reason, as both GTE Pro and Am are stacked with quality entries and are likely to play host to the closest racing. GTE Pro this year has had it ups and downs, and its fair share of drama up and down the field, but it’s been Porsche that has led the way with consistency. The German marque, against such stiff competition has taken control of the Drivers points battles and sealed the Manufacturers’ title at Spa. The foundations for its success have been laid throughout the season, thanks to its two screaming-mid-engined 911 RSRs taking wins at Le Mans, Fuji and Sebring, and scoring further podiums at every round. While the other teams have struggled to find any form, Porsche’s GT Team has been at times dominant, which is more than just impressive in a Balance of Performance-controlled formula. Michael Christensen and Kevin Estre in the team’s No.92 911 RSR have been the stars here, and head to the finale with a 36-point lead over their teammates in the No.91.

Le Mans 2019

Le Mans is its own race though, and all the other factories will be gunning for glory. After a slow start to its life as the flagship model, Aston Martin will hope its Vantage AMRs can challenge for their first win at La Sarthe, as too will BMW with its M8 GTEs. The older Ford GTs and AF Corse-run Ferraris too will of course be in the mix here, and have to fight not only their full-season competition, but the annual slew of IMSA guest entries (including of course two thunderous Corvettes) that will also be throwing the kitchen sink at Le Mans 2019.

GTE Am on the other hand, is a tighter points battle after seven of the eight races this season. It has been a roller-coaster in the pro-am division of GTE, with some of the best door-to-door action we’ve seen of any class, and a sprinkling of controversy to keep it all interesting. It looked almost certain that the No.88 Dempsey Proton Racing Porsche was going to march to the title, after winning Le Mans and Silverstone last year and scoring well at Spa, but at Fuji, it all changed. A huge penalty was handed to the team for a data logger infraction in Japan with the WEC opting to dock the team all its points. This hammering of the reset button for the class vaulted WEC debutant Team Project 1 into the title lead. It’s drivers Jorg Bergmeister, Patrick Lindsey and Egidio Perfetti have been strong all year, and as a trio getting stronger. They’ve shown consistency with four podiums and a win at Fuji. And even when the team had its backs against the wall at Sebring, after a huge fire in the pre-event test forced it to freight a spare car from Europe on short notice during race week, they still finished third. Another big result here would seal it, but after a slip up at Spa closed the points gap, of the five teams mathematically still in the fight, Spirit of Race and Aston Martin Racing in particular will be keen to win big in France and bring the end of the season to a fitting crescendo. There will be drama, especially as GTE AM is 17-cars strong for Le Mans 2019, thanks to the additional guest cars from Asia and Europe.

LMP1 Standings
1st.
No. 8 Toyota TS050 HYBRID – Fernando Alonso, Sebastien Buemi and Kazuki Nakajima: 160 points
2nd. No. 7 Toyota TS050 HYBRID – Mike Conway, Kamui Kobayashi and Jose Maria Lopex: 129 points
3rd.  No. 3 Rebellion R-13 Gibson – Thomas Laurent, Gustavo Menezes and Mathias Beche: 99 points

LMP2 Standings
1st
  No. 36 Signatech Alpine A460 – Nicolas Lapierre, Pierre Thiriet & Andre Negrao: 143 points
2nd No. 38 Jackie Chan DC Racing ORECA – Ho Pin Tung, Gabriel Aubry and Stephane Richelmi: 139 points

GTE Pro Drivers Standings
1st
No.92 Porsche 911 RSR – Michael Christensen and Kevin Estre: 140 points
2nd No.91 Porsche 911 RSR – Gianmaria Bruni, Richard Lietz: 104 points
3rd No. 51 AF Corse Ferrari 488 – James Calado, Alessandro Pier Guidi: 98.5 points

GTE Am Drivers Standings
1st:
No. 56 Team Project 1 Porsche, Jorg Bergmeister, Patrick Lindsey and Egidio Perfetti: 130 points
2nd No. 54 Spirit of Race Ferrari, Thomas Flohr, Francesco Castellacci and Giancarlo Fisichella: 119 points
3rd No. 98 Aston Martin Racing Vantage, Paul Dalla Lana, Pedro Lamy and Mathias Lauda: 87 points

Written by Stephen Kilbey
Photography by Dailysportscar.com